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English 213
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 213 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do we get th
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 11:00am EST
and technology intervention and art and science. which no other primate has done. there are simple examples of primates creating tools or using language but not in this indefinitely expanded hierarchical fashion that humans do. >> host: you are thinking of the main functions of the neocortex as high level functions such as decisionsmaking, inhibiting improper action, not so much -- see neocortex as a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high and low levels using the same algorithms. lot of pattern recognizers like the edges of objects or the capital wa and all these primitive functions. it is a high-level conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out as i was sending this to the publisher is what happens to the region of the neocortex ready optic words ago? it is very primitive pattern like the edges of objects. it is low level, very simple pattern. what happens to it? a blind person who is not getting any visual information, actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help process high-level language concepts. here is the same region doing
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
SFGTV
Dec 29, 2012 11:30am PST
] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other examples. along with that we will have a big conference with italian innovators and venture capitalists and along with large hi tech companies of silicon valley and come together and focus on specific projects how to work together for technological innovation. it will be focused on silicon valley but also the cultural institute in san francisco we have surprises for you that we're preparing. any other questions? >> [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] the problem of the public -- i would like for you to answer it -- [inaudible] >> i try not to be technical, but i hope i would be pervasive just telling you the debt crisis is basically a crisis connected to the governments of the euro system that has hit some countries for some reasons. somewhat we were hit because of the sins of our past. we have been having -- we have had a relatively a sizable but stable debt for a long t
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00am EST
the politics, what fdr called the science of human relationships, paid off. and i think that that's hugely important. and i mean it. i mean, dinner does not always end well. you can talk to jesus about that, you know? [laughter] never mind. never mind about that. [laughter] that's not here. last thing quickly, the politics of hope, every successful american president has convinced us that present pain is really an investment can and that a sacrifice in in the moment is not simply to be austere, for austerity's sake, but to make tomorrow better than today. whatever they can, they will, jefferson of americans. and the idea, he said i like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past which is very painful for me because i like both, of course. but he was able to project a vision of a reality that we could not see, but that he wanted us to reach. and i think that that's absolutely essential. as i said, we always learn more from sinners than from saints. his role in the perpetuation and protection of slavery is the great standing conviction, it's not an indictment, it's a convic
CBS
Dec 28, 2012 5:00am EST
behind the scenes look at the science behind field sobriety tests. they gave us unlimited access and very rare access into kind of behind the scenes. and so -- >> these are real people and real situations, the video is awesome. you don't want to miss this. it's really cool. thanks. >>> well, you can gamble 24 hours a day. 7 days a week at maryland live casino now. that's because maryland voters as you may remember approved the gambling referendum that made it possible and operators say the expanded hours at the hanover facility will lead to more jobs and more revenue for the state. the state's two other casinos have not adopted the 24/7 schedule yet. >>> i am watching your money. on wall street we've been down for four sessions in a row. hopefully we can change things today. but who knows? yesterday, stocks did head into positive territory briefly after lawmakers in the house announced plans to meet sunday to discuss the fiscal cliff. congress and the white house have less than a week to resolve this impasse. but here's where we did end up. checking the numbers for you -- >>> only four da
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 6:30pm EST
. others have operators -- what operators like to call a science fiction movie. that is deliberate. it are modeled after science fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. when you walk in, it is a bit like walking into a machine. the buildings are incredibly loud and cold from the air- conditioners that keep the machines cool. you cannot see the ceiling. there are usually cages around. big steel cages about half the size of a hotel room. each belongs to a network. that is where they keep the equipment securely. they interconnect aims that way. that is the physical connection. >> when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what are those wires made of? >> the predominately centers of the internet, the most important places are fiber-optic cables. there often yellow jumper cables. inside of them are strands of glass. inside of that glass our pulses of light. nano second morse code that can carry a baseline of about 10 gigabits or second of data. maybe 10,00
CBS
Dec 23, 2012 8:00am EST
technological surprises from harming national security. the life science pros jects are rooted in military needs like meeting the threat of microbes or treating brain injury in the battlefield but they promise to transform civilian medicine. darpa specializes in high reward research. many of its projects sound like science fiction. when completed isu
CBS
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
on 395. back to you. >>> last half hour we gave you a rare glimpse inside the science behind the field sobriety tests. what officers look for and how it all works. >> now we look at the science in action as the officers and our cameras leave the lab and hit the roads. delia goncalves has the exclusive ridealong with park police and this was really interesting. >> reporter: you know, when i spoke to park police during the day, they said these are the signs and this is what we see. we literally saw it all on the roads when we were out with them. this is the holiday season and so certainly very busy for them. unfortunately, when you take a look at this video, it is rare but it does show us just how widespread the problem of drinking and driving is on our local roads. ♪ we first met park police sergeant during the day. >> it's like i say to everybody it's a front row seat to the greatest show on earth. >> reporter: he said his best work at night. so he invited us out friday night to bw parkway. >> we're stopping people that have alcohol levels that are on average a .16 which is double th
FOX Business
Dec 24, 2012 10:00pm EST
rate of spending were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk talk" is coming up so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negotiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thought i would show you what thuld happen if we change into the speaker boehner plan, the president obama plan, let's start out with the do-nothing plan because that's the plan we0 have right now. the cbo estimates fiscal year 2013 deficit will be, well,lionf $104 trillion for fiscal year al 2013.well, it's so we get up to 2014, it is going to
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 7:30pm PST
for the democrats. and there are folks who with political science looking at this who will say that latinos are really -- that republicans are leaving a lot of latino votes on the table because they're not participating in a comprehensive immigration reform, and i think that that's something that we're going to start to see change. yeah. >> and let me just add to that, too. you touched on it earlier, josh, this whole idea of the divide, the economic divide and the haves and the have-nots, and certainly, latino voters are part of the have-nots in many occasions. the occupy movement, which really got started in 2011, but really exploded in places like oak laerland earlier this year. what impact do you think that had on the national conversation? >> i think it enshrined a place in the national dialogue for issues like income disparity. i mean, the whole fiscal cliff situation is very much, look at the way that's being framed. 98% versus 2%. it's very close to the 99% that was the rallying cry of occupy, and the same thing with the argument over jobs versus austerity. are we going to go the way
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 10:30pm EST
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00pm EST
master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 1:00am EST
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:32pm EST
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
SFGTV
Dec 26, 2012 2:30pm PST
the different varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00am EST
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
FOX Business
Dec 27, 2012 8:00pm EST
looking at a letter sense out today by committee of science, space and technology, they are talking about a man in department of energy, running the loan gar abty program who was using private e-mail accounts and office of science and technology, technology officer there conducting business with a private e-mail account, how widespread do you believe this is? >> you have to say how many places is this the being used. and there is no doubt that people are trying to use it to avoid compliance with the freedom of information act. that is absolutely unacceptable. we have to find out how widespreaddis it. how many accounts are being used. different accounts traps a number -- perhaps a number of accounts by the same person, we have to assure this is not being used to avoid compliance with the law, transparency is for important not only to us but to american citizens this is not done, that is something we're not going to let go of until we get to the bottom of it. tom. i hope not, people said why are people not held accountable for their actions? are -- forgive me, i do not know the procedure or
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, w
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
CNBC
Dec 26, 2012 1:00pm EST
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CNN
Dec 29, 2012 9:00am PST
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're about to say good-bye to 2012 but not before talking about some of the top legal cases of the year. for that we bring in the legal guys. avery friedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lo
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
that love. so that's my challenge to everybody, and science shows this. if you look at the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star -- [laughter] but just imagine when you look up and see a star, think to yours that a that's -- yourself that that's hundreds of billions of light years away, and many of those stars no longer exist n. the billions of years it's taken for that light to get to you, the star itself is gone. but the energy and light that a body gives off while it's alive goes on forever. it's immutable. people, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light of that body. that's who we are. we may have a finite time on this earth, but every single day we should be determined to burn as bright, warm and brilliant as possible. and that's the challenge. .. and knowing that, that gives us all an obligation to give back in every way possible and to me it's a secret to living a life of joy, a life of solace and a life of love. so thank you. [applause] >> want to thank the mayor for being with us. we want to take, for a couple of minutes a
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 5:30pm PST
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 6:30pm EST
. >> have there been environmental science associated with these data centers? >> absolutely. we have a whole chapter on the case of the amazon in northern virginia. amazon was assessed large fines. it was around $200,000. that is very high in the world. you do not see find that high very often. -- fines that high very often. they were not getting the environmental permits for those generators. they were running them and causing emissions without getting the proper permits. they tell me they have now obtained those permits in northern virginia. that is what amazon told me when i contacted them for this story. >> james glanz, the quincy experience, how is it that quincy has become a growth area for these data centers? >> that's right. half a dozen. yahoo is right there. microsoft is the biggest. these data centers tend to cluster. part of the reason is that if energy prices are low, you'll get a lot of these data centers coming in. but you have other factors that come into play. one is connectivity to the fiber-optic. there is a lot of fiber optic in quincy. other things like tax break
ABC
Dec 28, 2012 11:35pm PST
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PBS
Dec 27, 2012 4:00pm PST
to abandon the project. >> this is science at his toughest into this video from the british and arctic survey shows that backbreaking effort by 12 scientists and engineers trying to drill through the ice. with bare hands on steel, the mission depended on hot water being blasted down into the ice to open the routes to an ancient lake. from a tiny camp on the ice, it was to explore at the limits of our eyes was possible. the goal was to drill down of two miles to reach the waters below. the drilling went wrong. it did not get deeper. but hot water leaked into the ice around. it was a major blow to a daring project. huge quantities of snow were malted, heated up, sterilized. this team just not work. >> the pace was slower than we had planned for. we did not have enough fuel to get to the service of the lake. we are extremely disappointed by that outcome. >> the drilling was not the only problem, just before christmas, a vital spare part had to be flown out all the way from britain. in the end, three years of planning and 8 million pounds have drawn a blank. they might try again. for now, the lak
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 4:00am PST
what this does for this region. you know the bay area has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:00am EST
will continue. investment in science, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, make sure that we are bringing young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economy is for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of the economy and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and insuring the long term future of nasa, and essentials generator for our economy, insuring that stay at home moms and dads to work so hard raising children and contributing to the community to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard ridge is a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:00am EST
is an unabashed liberal but she is also on tv but she has a ph.d. in something, political science or something and charles murray would not want to be called a pundit. he is famous for controversy over the bell curve. this looks at white working-class to try to separate class from race which complicate everything and he looks at how the values of the lower white working class of gone down. there is this white elite adopted middle-class value, the working class lost those, a complex argument, advanced two places to describe these things. it is interesting, it is more than somebody ranting and raving. >> a scholar with the american enterprise institute as well, probably not fair to call him a political pundits. what about glen beck? he launched his own imprint, but his fox show is off the air. can you see the result of his sales? >> as far as i can tell glyn back, what he has been doing since he left fox has been trying to build a brand that reaches of very dedicated community not only through satellite oriented radio show but a new site called the blaze and other things going on through his web
FOX Business
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
the jobs act replaces green card lottery to permanent visas to those with doctorates in science, technology, engineering and math. two outgoing republican senators introducing legislation granting residence to those bought in the country illegally. though call it the achieve act, similar to the d.r.e.a.m. act. i spoke to one. bill's cosponsors, senator kay bailey hutchison. welcome to you here. how is your legislation different than the d.r.e.a.m. act? >> our legislation gives legal status to the young people in conundrum. they have grown up here. this is the country they know yet they are illegal because their parents brought them here before they were 14 years old. but we don't go into a citizenship track. we allow them to get in line behind the people who have been lawful and waited in line. so we don't give them a preference in line but we do give them a legal status and we don't prohibit them from getting in line if they choose to go the citizenship route. gerri: senator, what do you have to have to be able to be part of the program as you're defining it? >> you have to be under 14 whe
MSNBC
Dec 28, 2012 7:00pm PST
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudden, there was this guy standing there from the red cross. at a point where i had just lost everything, the idea that there was someone there... that's an amazing thing. ♪ temerity, temer . >>> the rising political star of 2013, chris hayes, who will that be? >> massachusetts senator elizabeth warren, i think it is not an easy thing to do what she did. you know, she was a star on this network and among progressives, but to go on particularly in massachusetts, i think she will be absolutely a force in massachusetts. >> it pains me to say it, but this is going to be the year when corey booker, he is either going to run for governor -- >> krystal, the rising star. >> the youngest woman in the house, also the first hindu-american woman in congress, combat veteran, really an amazing woman.
CNN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00am PST
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> the word shouldn't change from the original constitution, surely. >> my words aren't based on the constitution. >> i get that, but what it is is about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie. daniel day-lewis was great as lincoln. it was all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was acceptable who were outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular for the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> but we -- >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says that every man should be free. >> right, but you don't think every man should be free and equal. >> no -- of course we're free. and of course we're equal. >> what does that mean? >> you can love anybody you want to. >> but you don't think a gay man or woman should
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:00am EST
in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world political philosophy. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. his is a demarcation between the ancients and the moderns. the ancients took their political bearings from their understanding of the best of which people were capable. they sought to and large the likelihood of the emergence of fine and noble leaders. and the fine and noble attributes among them. machiavelli took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew, almost t
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in the eyes of
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. so when you walk and it's a bit like walking into a machine. their buildings inside are incredibly loud but incredibly cold from all the air-conditioners to keep the equipment cool. hugh also have a heated ceiling to obscure cables and there usually cages around, big steel cages maybe half the size of the hotel room and each belongs to network and that is where they keep their equipment securely and then run a wire to the top of the cage and drop it down into the cage of another network and interconnected that way. that is the physical internet connection and the internet world. >> host: when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what did our those wires made of and what are they carrying? >> guest: predominantly the centers of the internet, the most important places, they are
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:30am EST
in the christian science monitor's 15 best books of 2012 nonfiction. in "reagan and thatcher: the difficult relationship," richard aldous, literary professor at bard college, argues that the relationship between former president ronald reagan and former british prime minister margaret thatcher was more tumultuous than they let the public believe. author renya grande in "the distance between us: a memoir." in "embers of war: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org, or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures o
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 6:00pm EST
: spelman college in atlanta and... c-span: in what subject? >> guest: in political science. and my master's and phd from harvard. c-span: and where are you getting your interest in political science along the way? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved ou
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:35pm EST
have to do is look at what works. this is not rocket science. i came to washington as a novice in politics, believing in the power of ideas, seeing how ideas can revolutionize different industries, can create new products and services meeting the needs of customers everywhere. and that's what i hoped we could do here in washington. maybe naively i went to work in the house, often working with the heritage foundation to create a better product here in washington. i saw social security, and not many people look below the surface, but we knew it was going broke. we knew we were taking in money that people were paying for this social security retirement benefit, but we were spending it all. and i thought, what an opportunity it would be for future generations, for my children, if we actually saved what people were putting into social security for their retirement. and you didn't have to do too much math to see that even for middle-class workers that americans could be millionaires when they retired if we even kept half of what was put into social security for them. it seemed like a
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